Tag Archives: David Walbert

October Miracle

And no, I ain’t talkin’ baseball.

Today marks the first time since we got the chicks in March that we got 5, count ’em, 5 eggs in one day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’ve typically gotten 4: three brown, one blue (like the bigger blue one to the right). Then, once about a month or so ago, we got a teeny little blue egg like the one on the left. Over the past week, we’ve gotten two blues, and two browns. But today? All my lovely chickens gave it up.

Now The Wife will finally have to put her “that one’s a rooster — I just know it” theories to rest. That alone is worth what it took to get here.

Real Canning Looks Like This

I’m reading a book titled: Garden Spot: Lancaster Country, the Old Order Amish and the Selling of Rural America by David Walbert, in the hopes of finding material for the composition class I’m teaching next semester, focusing on sustainable food production. Here’s a quote that stopped me short. In 1950, Walbert says,

It was still not unusual for an Amish farmwife to can 500-700 quarts of fruits and vegetables, plus apple butter, jellies, and dried apples, beans and corn.But the economic argument for buying those products instead of producing them at home was starting to win out. The old idealizations of family farming persisted, but in the postwar years, changes in real-life agriculture would force it to adapt.

500-700 quarts. Every year.

That’s phenomenal. That’s a lot of hard work. I feel virtuous if I get 100 pints done by the end of a summer. And most of that is plum jam.

500 quarts every year is not a record I’m interested in achieving, but dang, my hat is off to the Amish farmwives who did (and perhaps do) all that work to keep their families and communities fed.

 

 

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